Friday, September 18, 2009

Experts at Law: War & conflict, ICL & IHL

(One in a series on Experts at Law)

Inspired by Diane Marie Amann's post on female international law scholars with expertise in the field of national security law, IntLawGrrls has created a new series entitled Experts at Law. Organized by field of expertise, this series of posts aims to provide easily accessible information to conference organizers, media, and others who seek expert opinions on a variety of subjects while ensuring gender balance. The list below provides institutional affiliations for as well as links to the bios and publications of and blog posts by or about our Experts at Law, who are comprised of IntLawGrrls bloggers, guests, and alumnae and presented in alphabetical order. Some offer specific areas of expertise within the broader topic presented.
If you'd like to find this series again in the future, it's easy -- just scroll down the page until you find the "IntLawGrrls series" menu on the right, and click on "Experts at Law."
Today's list focuses on female international law scholars with expertise in areas of law relating to war and conflict, including international criminal law, international humanitarian law, national security law, terrorism, and transitional justice. If you seek an expert in another field of international law, not to worry -- additional areas of expertise will be listed in posts over the next two weeks.

International criminal law and transitional justice
Diane Marie Amann, Univ. of California at Davis, (publications, blogs): international and transnational criminal justice
Elena Baylis, Univ. of Pittsburgh, (publications, blogs): post-conflict justice
Doris Buss, Carleton Univ., Ottawa (publications, blogs)
Margaret deGuzman, Temple Univ., Philadelphia, (publications, blogs)
Chimene Keitner, Univ. of California, Hastings (publications, blogs)
Linda M. Keller, Thomas Jefferson School of Law, San Diego, (publications, blogs)
Fiona de Londras, Univ. College Dublin, (publications, blogs): feminist critiques of international criminal tribunals
Carmen Marquez-Carrasco, Univ. of Seville, (publications, blogs): the crime of aggression, crimes against humanity, history of international criminal law, the International Criminal Court, international criminal jurisdictions, reparations, universal jurisdiction
Valerie Oosterveld, Univ. of Western Ontario, (publications, blogs): gender issues in international criminal justice
Noëlle Quénivet, Bristol Law School, (publications, blogs): genocide, war crimes
Jaya Ramji-Nogales, Temple Univ., Philadelphia, (publications, blogs): transitional justice
Susan Harris Rimmer, Australian National Univ., (publications, blogs): feminist theory and transitional justice
Naomi Roht-Arriaza, Univ. of California, Hastings (publications, blogs): post-conflict and transitional justice, universal jurisdiction
Susana SaCouto, War Crimes Research Office, American Univ., Washington DC (publications, blogs): international criminal tribunals
Amy Senier, Foley, Hoag LLP, Boston, (publications, blogs): transitional justice
Beth Van Schaack, Santa Clara Univ., (publications, blogs)

International humanitarian law
Diane Marie Amann, Univ. of California at Davis, (publications, blogs)
Stephanie Farrior, Vermont Law School, (publications, blogs)
Carmen Marquez-Carrasco, Univ. of Seville, (publications, blogs): gender and IHL, humanitarian assistance
Monica Hakimi, Univ. of Michigan, (publications, blogs)
Noëlle Quénivet, Bristol Law School, (publications, blogs)
Susan Harris Rimmer Australian National Univ., (publications, blogs)
Beth Van Schaack, Santa Clara Univ., (publications, blogs)

National security and terrorism
See also Diane Marie Amann's list of experts here
Diane Marie Amann, Univ. of California at Davis, (publications, blogs)
Elena Baylis, Univ. of Pittsburgh, (publications, blogs): the "war on terror"
Karima Bennoune, Rutgers-Newark, (publications, blogs): terrorism
Monica Hakimi, Univ. of Michigan, (publications, blogs): the "war on terror" including detentions, mistreatment, questions on the applicable (U.S. and international) law, and renditions
Kristine A. Huskey, Univ. of Texas, (publications, blogs): national security law, the "war on terror"
Fiona de Londras, Univ. College Dublin, (publications, blogs): terrorism and counter-terrorism
Susan Harris Rimmer Australian National Univ., (publications, blogs): rights-based approaches to counter-terrorism law
Beth Van Schaack, Santa Clara Univ., (publications, blogs): the "war on terror"

War and conflict
Elena Baylis, Univ. of Pittsburgh, (publications, blogs): ethnic conflict and minority rights
Karima Bennoune, Rutgers-Newark, (publications, blogs): armed conflict, child soldiers, religious extremism
Doris Buss, Carleton Univ., Ottawa (publications, blogs): rape and sexual violence against women in conflict settings
Naomi Cahn, George Washington Univ., (publications, blogs): child soldiers, disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration, post-conflict transition
Monica Hakimi, Univ. of Michigan, (publications, blogs): armed conflict
Kristine A. Huskey, Univ. of Texas, (publications, blogs): United Nations draft convention regarding mercenaries, the use of private military/security companies in armed conflict
Carmen Marquez-Carrasco, Univ. of Seville, (publications, blogs): humanitarian intervention, prohibition on the use of force, Security Council powers and practice, right to self-defense
Noëlle Quénivet, Bristol Law School, (publications, blogs): girl soldiers, peacekeeping operations, rape and sexual violence against women in conflict settings, right to self defense


6 comments:

Rachel said...

A great idea - worth linking to shesource.org (online resource of women experts for journalists) if you haven't already done so.

Leon said...

Cheers to women international law experts!

But sadly, just like the men from the West who co-dominate the institutions that tells us what "international" law is (which almost always is what the "international" community says so), this list is an all-Western/developed country institution list. No one from India is an expert? Or from Vietnam? Or from Uganda? Or from Ecuador?

Jaya Ramji-Nogales said...

Thanks, Leon -- that's a great point. Because the list is designed as an opt-out list (we don't want to include anyone without their explicit permission), it has been limited to those academics with whom we cross paths most often, who are largely Western. I hope that female international law scholars from the developing world will contact me as I would be most pleased to add them to our list!

Jaya Ramji-Nogales said...

Thanks for the suggestion, Rachel!

Marjorie Florestal said...

Excellent work Jaya! It's wonderful to see the international expertise of so many women on display. Too often, our voices are overlooked in favor of more "familiar" male voices. Leon, your point is well taken. No, Western women do NOT have a monopoly on expertise. I think we try hard on this blog to underscore the point. Jaya, maybe we could be a bit proactive and ask our colleagues to reach out to their contacts in the developing world asking for their participation?

Marjorie Florestal said...

. . . Jaya, I meant to add that I'm happy to help coordinate in any way I can.